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Medical errors put expecting mothers at risk of harm

| Aug 25, 2018 | Birth Injuries

One of the things our country prides itself on is its advances in medical research and technologies, which allow Texans to receive quick and effective medical care. In some circumstances, though, medical professionals fail to live up to this vision. Sometimes they have even considered some lapses in medical care to those seen in third-world countries.

For example, a recent study conducted by USA Today found that more than 50,000 mothers were subjected to serious injuries during birth, while approximately 700 died. More terrifying is the fact that the investigation deemed more than half of these injuries and deaths preventable. This makes the U.S. the most dangerous place to give birth in any developed country. The two biggest threats to mothers is hypertension and hemorrhaging.

The report indicated that 60 percent of all birthing deaths caused by hypertension could have been prevented with proper medical intervention. The prevention rate for hemorrhaging was 90 percent. Such action could be something as simple as administering proper medication in a timely fashion or taking proper measurements when it comes to blood loss. This is unacceptable, and so is the fact that many hospitals have inadequate reporting and tracking standards, which disallow them from identifying and remedying issues that contribute to this problem.

The victims of hospital negligence are often left with serious damages that can be physical, emotional and financial in nature. They may find themselves struggling to pay medical expenses and everyday bills at a time when they are angry at the way they were treated by those they trusted with their health and well-being. For these individuals, a medical malpractice lawsuit may prove beneficial. It may not only allow them to recover the compensation they need, but it can also help provide a sense of justice, while at the same time, shining a light on a problem that needs more attention.

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