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Brain injuries not limited to high-impact scenarios

| Jun 28, 2013 | Firm News, Wrongful Death

The human brain is an incredibly powerful organ, yet it is likely more delicate than many Houston residents realize. The brain needs an ample supply of blood and oxygen, and it needs to be protected from sudden impacts. While motorcyclists, football players, construction workers and others typically wear protective head gear, it does not necessarily take a forceful blow from a hard object to cause damage to the brain.

For example, it may surprise some readers of our Houston Medical Malpractice Law Blog to learn that soccer players are susceptible to brain injuries. Soccer players often use their heads to stop and redirect the ball to another player or to the goal when it is in the air, which is called “heading.” In a recent research study, players who used heading anywhere from 900 to 1,500 times a year had significantly lower brain health scores. Players who used heading more than 1,800 times a year demonstrated memory loss. Frequent heading in soccer, researchers concluded, is linked to brain injury and concussion.

Traumatic brain injury comes in varying degrees. Less serious traumatic brain injury can cause temporary issues such as headaches, dizziness, difficulty sleeping, and loss of consciousness among other ailments. Severe traumatic brain injury can cause permanent damage and can lead to seizures, nerve damage, infection, cognitive and communication problems and a host of other issues, even death. Brain injuries of all degrees can result from a medical provider’s negligence, including situations involving birth complications, surgical complications, anesthesia complications and other instances of medical negligence.

If a Houston resident suffers a head or brain injury as a result of medical negligence, families may want to consult a legal professional for help in their situation. The road to recovery can be a long and costly one, and victims may be entitled to compensation.

Source: CTV News, “Soccer ball ‘heading’ linked to brain injury: study,” June 18, 2013

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